Two Men, Two Pits and a Blog

A Smokin’ Easter: Hickory Apple Double Smoked Ham

Nothing is quite so fine as firing up your pit on Easter morning. The smell of hickory wafting in the early sunbeams, the finches flirting in the fragrant spruce, and the world today, as most days go, seems to be rotating a little slower. There is leisure in the air, aloft with the wood smoke, and every fiber of your BBQ being knows it. The token urban madness is displaced it seems, with quieter streets, strolling neighbors, and driveways of parked cars, patron to house holds filled with warm banter and good food. And I like that. We had family coming over too, because once upon a time, I had leaked word that one could aptly pump up the flavor of your run of the mill smoked ham by ten times, if you smoked it again. Well it wasn’t long before I was asked one year to do the Easter ham, and well, that’s how traditions start I guess. My privilege. And that is what we’re up to at the pit this day. Smokin’ that good Easter ham. So get yourself a bib tied on, and lets commence with the task at hand. But be warned, once you do it on the smoker, you may never want to put your ham in the oven again. Man it’s good!

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Now the first order of business, that is after of course pouring yourself a lovely beverage, is to rub your ham down in mustard. No, it’s not a flavor thing really, but as many smoke masters know, it is an adhering agent. In point of fact, I never heard of any one who can even taste the mustard whence the cook is complete. Think of it maybe as a primer for your rub. Lots of folks rub down all matter of cuts of meat in mustard before applying the rub. It’s just a great way for getting your rub to stick. Anyways, our rub today is as simple as it gets – brown sugar. That’s it. You can use what ever you like of course, but we went with good smearing of brown sugar. Then decorated it with pineapple slices, not just for cosmetic value, but also for the self-basting effect of smoking pineapples. It’s important here to let the ham and the sugar get to know one another for a while. To mingle. Wait until the sugar has liquefied, and becomes tacky to the touch before it goes on the smoker, for improved reception to the smokey goodness imparted upon it.

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Hams are delightfully easy to double smoke because most hams that you’re used to are already cooked. Which nicely removes the pressure of wondering if its done or not. However, you want it hot, so the target internal temp to shoot for is 140 degrees, which is a good eating temperature for most tongues, save for the most hardened coffee drinkers. So I put the maverick probe in, just to keep tabs. With your smoker set at 250 degrees, most hams will take about 3 hours. Otherwise just keep an eye on that internal temperature.  The smoke wood today is hickory, since the ham was originally hickory smoked to start with. It’s good to match it up if you can, however, I also tossed in a couple chunks of apple wood too, because that’s just how I roll.

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Around 130 internal, you’ll want to start brushing on your glaze. The glaze we used was almost as simple as the rub.

Maple Ham Glaze

Mix together in your sauce pan the following:

  • 1/2 cup apple juice
  • 1/2 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup maple syrup

Then proceed to varnish your ham with liberal abandoned. When it reaches 140 internal, go ahead and bring it inside and foil it. Let it rest as you do, as the juices find their way back through the smoke-scented meat. Note the aromas in the air, how they fill the house, and how your people at once beckon closer to thee, for to sample a bite perhaps, before the dinner bell tolls. Snag the choicest bits for the pit master of course.

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Hickory Apple Double Smoked Ham, with a Maple Brown Sugar Glaze. Man! With a special thanks to our Savior, for He’s the reason we even get to smoke a ham today in the first place. Amen.

*Stomachs, time, and the rest of the food out-paced our Easter ham, and I had to reluctantly pull it from the smoker too soon, and accelerate it in the oven. And tho it didn’t come out the most attractive thing after that, rest assured, it was still as moist and savory as it was smokey, complimented with that wonderful, sweet glaze. And bellies were filled. 

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13 responses

  1. Amen!

    April 3, 2013 at 7:44 am

  2. Pardon me while I drool on your blog!

    April 3, 2013 at 7:48 am

  3. Liz

    love that every fiber of your BBQ being knows these things…good read as always

    April 3, 2013 at 9:17 am

  4. Reblogged this on My Meals are on Wheels.

    April 3, 2013 at 9:34 am

  5. Hoo boy. I just saw this around lunch time and now I’m even hungrier. Bad timing on my part! Looks incredible though!

    April 3, 2013 at 11:06 am

    • I know it. Reading food blogs at lunch time is a pleasurable torment at best! Thanks for swinging by!

      April 3, 2013 at 11:13 am

  6. debbeedoodles

    I want to get David a Weber Smoker this Christmas. He currently has a Brinkmann Water Smoker.

    April 3, 2013 at 1:42 pm

    • Oh he will love it. They work so good, and would look really cool on his deck!

      April 3, 2013 at 3:44 pm

      • debbeedoodles

        Yes, I’m sure it would! 😉

        April 3, 2013 at 7:03 pm

  7. Is there such a thing as too much smoke? Nah! 🙂

    April 4, 2013 at 2:16 pm

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