Two Men, Two Pits and a Blog

Posts tagged “beef

Smoking Time and Temperatures

Every once in a while we like to do a guest post. Today is one of those times. Below is a chart and intro made up for us by Joe, at SmokedBBQSource. He’s developing a website full of resources useful to the BBQ community, and he has shared his latest efforts with us. I found this little chart of smoking times and temperatures to be an effective and handy reference, thus we humbly pass it along to the PotP readership for your kind perusal. Enjoy!

And thanks Joe!

-PotP



From Smoked BBQ Source:

You probably already know how important managing temperature is when you barbecue. You’ve got to closely monitor your smoker and make sure it stays within the right temperature range for hours at a time.

You’ve also got to know the right time to pull your meat off the smoker so you’re not left with a dry, overcooked mess.

While most meat can be smoked between 225 – 250°F, the best temperature to pull is going to vary a lot with what you’re cooking.

While there are no hard and fast rules, this visual, smoking time and temperature chart is a good resource to check before you fire up the smoker.

Just remember that it all comes down to your individual setup. Use this guide as a starting point, and then experiment to see what works best for you.

Here are a few other pieces of advice:

The smoking time suggestions as a very rough estimate: The problem with using hours / lb to estimate smoking time, is that the thickness and diameter of what your smoking is more important than the total weight.

There’s also a lot of other factors like humidity and how well insulted your smoker is that can effect total smoker time. Bottom line, always use a digital thermometer to determine when your food is ready.

There’s a big difference between ‘done’ and ‘ready to eat’: If you always pull your meat when it reaches a safe internal temp, you will be missing out on a world of flavor. In many cases you want to go well past the ‘recommended safe temperature’ as the collagen and fats continue to melt and make your meat even more juicy.

-smokedbbqsource



smoking chart

Advertisements