Two Men, Two Pits and a Blog

8-Below Beef Po Boys On The Grill

Dateline: January 20, 2013

Temperature: -8 degrees Fahrenheit .

Mission: Po Boys on the Grill!

That is probably what the neighbors were thinking anyway, when they glanced out their dining room window this morning and saw me  yonder, tending my grill. Po boy. Poor boy indeed, having to BBQ when it’s eight degrees below the blessed zero mark. Who would be so daft to grill in temperatures so obscene, they ask, as they shake their head, and sip their fancy coffee. Clearly they have never made the acquaintanceship of this blog.

afterfocus_1358718855719_edit0

The Po Boy is a shredded beef sandwich invented and forged in Louisiana, patron to my southern roots, where true BBQ is not only a given, but a way of life. We have been in a sandwich mood here at the pit lately, so why not pay homage to the homeland of my kin down yonder, and do up one of the finer culinary contributions of the south, the Po Boy sandwich, on the grill of course. Granted if a Louisianan were to have stepped out on my patio today, and felt that bone-stabbing cold, they surely would have locked their eyeballs to the tip their nose, and keeled over in a fashion suitable for a coronary thrombosis. Best to let us northern boys handle this one, mates, and show you how it’s done this side of zero. Life at the edge, of fire and ice.

20130120_131950_edit0

The journey began with a lightly seasoned 4 pound chuck roast, of which was dotingly seared over a hot bed coals, a couple of minutes per side.  Since it was colder than Frosty’s carrot out there, I made the fire extra big, and employed the minion method to boot, a tactic essential for this epic, arctic cook. Then get yourself a pot for the roast, (not your wife’s good cake pan) along with some lightly sautéed onions and garlic. Lastly, flood it with a rather copious quantity of beef broth, enough ideally, to cover the meat. Position the pot indirect, put on the lid, tip your hat to a job well done, and make way for your nearest beverage of choice.

The next step is not to be in a hurry. These big roasts take time. Time for the internal temps to crest high enough to start breaking down the connective tissues and collagen, and enter the food realm better known as savory. You want this meat to fall apart easily. In point of fact, old Po Boy folklore has it, the meat should fall apart with a” hard stare”.  And that’s easy to do if you take your time.  There is no haste in a pit master’s mojo. For we know the world spends fast enough as it is, thus let our meat at least, tarry back in the quiet eddies of life. Back with the slowly ebbing sun in a pastel sky, and the gentle smoke which rises serenely from our pits.

Screenshot_2013-01-20-09-08-00

Eight degrees below the zero mark ain’t exactly the optimal weather for loitering pit side, but it turns out if you can see your pit from inside the house somewhere, well, that’s good enough. And since the football playoffs were on the TV, it didn’t take much coaxing to take up residence in the man chair, and while away a few hours, whilst the grill puffed away in the deep, penetrating cold. Oh how I reveled at the intense labors of being a pit master, with my feet at the fireplace, swaddled in blankets, my eyes drooping on and off, and the football game bantering in the back ground. Eventually, after some fashion, I even woke up, with a trail of drool spilling out of my left lip pit. Glory, this is the life!

20130120_171713_edit0

After about 5 hours, the meat was done, and falling apart like an alcoholic at a moonshine conference. No hardened stare necessary. It was then time to toast the French bread. Apparently you will be frowned upon if you use anything other than French bread for your Po Boy, so be warned, less you stand at the receiving end of some unruly Cajun ridicule. So French bread it was. We put a little mayonnaise on the bread, and packed it full of the savory meat, and a little lettuce for good measure to suit the lady folk. Man! There are plenty of high-end sandwiches in the world, and let it be said, this is one of them.

afterfocus_1358726073010_edit0

Next time you’re in the mood for something different, and have a little time, try grilling up some Beef Po Boy Sandwiches. Subzero temperatures optional.

Advertisements

8 responses

  1. This method works really well at about 18deg in northern IN with a pork roast.
    Great blog !
    Paul

    January 21, 2013 at 9:58 pm

    • 18 degrees you say, wow, that’s like Miami Beach!

      January 22, 2013 at 8:59 am

      • Thought you’d say that !!! Ha!

        January 22, 2013 at 1:27 pm

  2. I’m SO glad it’s not that cold here in Phoenix!! 76 out right now 🙂 Those sandwiches look killer though 🙂

    January 22, 2013 at 3:18 pm

    • Very nice. I’ll be in AZ in a few weeks. I look forward to the nice weather out there. We love grilling in sub zero degree weather,I hope to throw some meat on the grill while I’m out there. What’s a good BBQ place to eat while out there??

      January 22, 2013 at 4:15 pm

      • Head to Rudy’s BBQ in Chandler, off of Chandler Blvd and I-10! It’s a bit on the south end of the city, as you’re heading east/south-east like toward Tucson, but they’re worth a stop definitely. Authentic Texas BBQ, Rudy’s originated there and now we’re lucky to have a location in the valley! Try the brisket and the green chile stew!

        January 22, 2013 at 7:45 pm

      • Another spot to try is Texas Barbecue House in metro Phoenix.I haven’t been so I can’t personally vouch for it, but I’ve heard great things! http://www.texasbbqhouseaz.com

        January 22, 2013 at 7:47 pm

      • Thank you. I will do my best to see if I can make it to one or more of these places. If so I’ll write up an article on the event.

        January 23, 2013 at 6:06 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s